Building Your Blog’s Rate Sheet (+Free Downloadable Template)

Building your Blog Rate Sheet

If you’re here, you’re a blogger who is has developed some level of success or following, and now want to begin partnering with brands, tourism boards, and other companies. If you don’t have a rate sheet, this article will help you build an efficient, well-formatted, and unique one.

If you already have one, spoof it up by crossing checking it against this article to make sure it’s optimized for success.

A well-made rate sheet is an important piece of successfully pitching brands and monetizing your blog, and I’m here to help you do it.

Why do you need a rate sheet?

When you reach the point in your blogging journey where you are ready to begin reaching out to brands, or you’ve already begun being approached by brands, you need a rate sheet.

Firstly, a rate sheet means that you’ve put in forethought to you the worth of your blog, your audience, and most importantly, your time.

A rate sheet shows reliability and professionalism. #blogging #monetize Click To Tweet

A rate sheet shows reliability and professionalism, that you aren’t just some beginner blogger who has no concept of partnering, and will make brands more secure in their decision to work with you.

Some Rate Sheet Essentials:

Blog Name

An easy but awful mistake to make is to forget your blog or businesses name! Your blog/businesses name should be easily seen and easy to remember.

Since your rate sheet will likely be sent in conjunction with your media kit, you don’t need to include any explanations about you or your blog, as it will just take up space. Your media kit essentially a listicle of what services you provide, and their specific prices.

“Rate Sheet”

If you’re sending your rate sheet out in email pitches like you should be, you need to be very obvious in which PDF is what. You could be sending out your media kit, rate sheet, contract, and other documents all at once.

Having “Blog Rate Sheet” clearly visible.helps brands who may download all of these items at once, be able to click through them with ease.

Also, be sure to name the actual PDF or WordDoc something obvious as well.

Mine is named Packs Light Blog Rate Sheet – 052117.pdf

It includes my blogs name, the document type, and the day it was last updated, May 21, 2017.

Contact information

You may send someone your rate sheet over Facebook Messenger, Instagram DM, Twitter, etc.

Include your contact information like email, or even business phone number or Whatsapp so that if they like your rates, they can easily reach out to you and propose a partnership!

Adding your social media handles as clickable links also makes it easier for brands to interact with your accounts. 

Blog Rates and Social Media Rates

Obviously, a key component of your rate sheet.

I found it easier to organize my rates into “Blog Rates” and “Social Media Rates”, as they do operate as separate entities for me.

In my blog rates I included pricing for advertisements in my monthly newsletter, my blog content, my blog pages, and other things like photography and videography services.

In social media rates I price out for minimum social media posts on platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and YouTube.

Keep scrolling down to see how I figure out how I figured out exactly what to price for everything!

As you can see in the example below, I also composed “packages” where I compile standard services I may provide for a brand, ad encourage them to purchase those for the best deal for both them and I.

Learn how to develop your blog rate sheet to be formatted properly for success!

*Some additional rate sheet tips:

1.) If you have a service that you price for on a case-by-case basis like photography sessions or videos, don’t be afraid to put “TBD” on your rate sheet!

2.) Packages help prospective partners decide if a partnership with you will be collectively “budget”, “moderate”, or “costly”. Again, be sure to charge true and don’t be embarrassed to be budget or afraid to be costly. Packages help set your standard rates, but you can always adjust per the scope of each project!

3.) If you’re an international traveler or your business has international partners, be sure to specify the currency in your rate sheets! Don’t want ¥‎ vs. $ to bite you in the butt later!

4.) Put lower reaching social medias at a minimum of 2 or 3 posts. If you offer multiple tweets or posts with a small reach, it can compensate that and add value!

5.) Again, it should be a no-brainer but make sure your name, website URL, email address, and even business phone number are included on your rate sheet.

Charge true—use this article to build your blog rate sheet and get paid what you're worth! #blogging Click To Tweet

How much should you charge?

My social blue book stats for this May.

My social blue book stats for this May.

The actual rates that each blogger should charge are, honestly, subjective at best.

There are awesome tools like Social Bluebook where you can get approximated rates for your website and social media channels. To the right, you can see my Social Bluebook analysis and what sort of things it provides you.

People can tell you to charge X amount per X percent of followers, but honestly only you know your true value based on your engagement, quality of content, experience, and range of services. So always be fair and only charge what you’re really worth.

But that includes not short selling yourself! The bane of any bloggers existent is other  bloggers who sell themselves extremely short, and lowers the average rate for everyone else! Don’t be afraid to fight to get paid for what you’re worth.

Pitching properly: the key to success

After 1.5 years, I still consider myself an amateur blogger. And you can find tons of pitching advice through Google from huge bloggers like Travel Blog Success or the Explorista.

However, still I’ve had my fair share of successes and failures so I feel I can still provide some advice.

Firstly, pitch within your means. I’m not saying you shouldn’t pitch for the stars, because your absolutely should… once you have some experience.

When starting out, you may not have the experience to feel out situations where you may need to charge more or less than usual. You should aim for appropriate pay and experience at the beginning, and then you can “get fancy” with negotiations later.

Also, lead with your strengths—if you have a super specific niche and high engagement, mention that. If you have 10 years of experience writing, mention that. If you have a huge network of relevant connections, mention that.

PR staff and brands see multiple pitches every week. It’s in your best interest to stand out in the best way!

I hope the guide helped you! And happy pitching, monetizing, and of course, blogging!

If you are interested in a FREE Downloadable of my own personal blog rate sheet temple, subscribe below and have it sent instantly to your inbox!


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Click through for a guide to building your Blog Rate Sheet no matter your niche. Also, get my FREE downloadable template!

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Learn why having a rate sheet is a pivotal part of monetizing your blog, what you need to include, and other tips you should know! And take a peek at mine!

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